I am a "lectionary preacher."

Many of you have probably figured out by now that I am a “lectionary preacher.” The Lectionary is designed on a three-year cycle that roughly covers most of the Bible. Each Sunday has four assigned readings: an Old Testament reading, a reading from the Book of Psalms, an Epistle reading, and a Gospel reading. A Lectionary preacher follows these assigned readings and in theory can pick any of the four readings on which to preach. Generally, I preach on the Gospel, though occasionally I will pick an OT passage if it is one of my favorites. Following the Lectionary as a preacher is a form of spiritual discipline. On the one hand, it builds faith by trusting that the Holy Spirit can still speak through the assigned reading to whatever current situation arises. On the other hand, it forces the preacher to preach even on difficult passages, instead of avoiding them, like I will be doing this Sunday when I preach on the Canaanite woman who asks Jesus to heal her daughter and Jesus calls her a “dog” (Matt 15:26). In this passage, when read in context and without inserting preconceived theological notions that came much later, such as Jesus’ infallibility, we see Jesus displaying his full humanity by changing his mind and evidencing self-growth–characteristics which I find admirable in any human, especially a leader, and which helps me identify even more closely with Jesus. I hope you can tune in! Also, keep your ears opened for opportunities to participate in our Sunday morning worship service through prerecorded activities that can be done at home and inserted into the order of service. I imagine you are getting tired of seeing me jumping up and down like whack-a-mole every Sunday! Let us know if this interests you and if you and/or your family would like to be part of this rotation.

2 Timothy 3:16-17: All scripture is inspired by God and is useful for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, so that everyone who belongs to God may be proficient, equipped for every good work.

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